Adult, Professional and Graduate Programs


Undergraduate Program

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Degree-Completion Programs

“I was blown away by how perfect it was for an adult learner with a career and a family.”

– Cathy Vickers, December 2006 graduate, Greensboro News & Record, 6/20/10.

“The OLM (formerly BBA) program has allowed me to obtain a bachelors degree under circumstances that would have prohibited me from doing so. I feel privileged that I can work 60 hours per week and still maintain my status as a full time student. I doubted that I would ever get an associates degree, much less anything higher, but now my dream of finishing college is coming true and I’m succeeding with flying colors!”  Andrew W., Class of 2014

For more information contact Becky Quigley at becky.quigley@greensboro.edu or call 336-272-7102, ext. 5210.

Apply now.

“I have most enjoyed the convenient schedule that the OLM (formerly BBA) program offers. The program and the professors really cater to adults and anyone like myself who has a job, family, or other obligations outside of school. I feel the way in which the program is set up and organized just about guarantees that I will be successful.” – Erika D., Class of 2014

 

The program was geared toward a working adult, with evening and weekend classes. A lot of times the questions I was asking weren’t book-related. The professors were not just academics but also experienced in business fields.” Ryan C., Class of 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“This program has also allowed me to hone my current skill set while learning new methodologies and business practices applicable to the career path I intend to take. I have been able to ensure a prosperous future for myself because Greensboro College has provided me with the tools necessary to compete in today’s job market.” – Keya S.


 

 

 

What is the Bachelor’s of Business Administration in Organizational Leadership and Management Program?

The Greensboro College Bachelor’s of Business Administration in Organizational Leadership and Management (OLM) Program is a degree-completion program designed to fit the busy lives of working adults. The 72-hour program, which leads to a bachelor’s of business administration, will take participants two years, including summers, to complete. Students enjoy a cohort-based classroom, which means they work through the two-year program with the same group of learners. With each class, this group becomes a supportive family, encouraging one another toward a common goal of earning a degree. Our OLM students also benefit from a low-maintenance schedule of classes on every Monday night. 

We’ve eliminated the traditional obstacles adult students face when returning to college, so you can truly focus on your education and earning your degree.


What are the admission requirements?

  • 12 hours of transferable college course work (if a student has less than 12 hours of college coursework completed, a high school transcript or GED transcript is required)
  • a minimum of a 2.5 grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) in all college work completed.
  • 3-5 years professional employment is preferred.

What are the graduation requirements?

The program consists of 40 hours of business, economics and accounting courses and 32 hours of related courses. Although the program is a 72-hour program, participants will need to complete successfully a minimum of 124 hours of coursework, including acceptable transfer and experiential credit, to receive a degree. Degree requirements for the Bachelor’s of Business Administration in Organizational Leadership and Management are as follows:

  • completion of a minimum of 124 semester hours with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0.
  • completion of the 72-semester-hour OLM Program with a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in all coursework required for the OLM Program.
  • completion of the general education requirements for the OLM

What are the general education requirements for the Bachelor’s of Business Administration in Organizational Leadership and Management Program?

English and Communications Studies (6 credit hours)

  • ECM 1100 Texts and Contexts
  • ECM 1120 Scholarly Texts and Contexts

Religion (4 credit hours)

  • XBP 4165 Ethics and Work (H)
Social Sciences (8 credit hours)
  • XBP 3145 Foundations of Economics
  • XBP 3195 Economic Issues

Natural Sciences/Mathematics (15 credit hours)

  • College-level mathematics course
  • XBP 4110 Statistics for Management Analysis
  • XBP 3160 Human Capital Science

Global Perspective (4 credit hours)

  • Humanities Course: All students must complete a Humanities course. For students in the Professional Bachelor’s Program in Business Administration, the Humanities course is XBP 4165, Ethics and Work (H).
  • XBP 4150 Emerging Markets in the Global Economy

    Oral proficiency is satisfied for OLM students through the completion of XBP 3120, Business and Administrative Communication; and XBP 4120, Principles of Strategic Marketing.


    What are the program’s courses?

    (Numbers in parentheses are the credit hours earned in each course.)

    XBP 3105 Systems Thinking Management (4)
    This course fosters an understanding of the management principles that must be used to effectively guide behavior in organizations. The course introduces the concepts of planning, directing, organizing and controlling, providing an overview of the field and practice of management.

    XBP 3120 Professional Communication (4)
    This course provides extensive practice in business communication for professionals using computer technology to produce different types of correspondence, formal written reports and oral presentations supported by software such as Power Point.

    XBP 3145 Foundations of Economics (4)
    This course introduces the fundamentals of both microeconomics and macroeconomics, including supply and demand, the theory of the firm, consumer behavior, macroeconomic equilibrium, unemployment and inflation. Students will also be introduced to economic methodology, including creating arguments, empirical verification and policy decision-making. Students are required to demonstrate proficiency in written communication.

    XBP 3150 Financial Accounting (4)
    This course introduces the basic principles of accounting. The course will focus on the art of recording, classifying, and summarizing financial transactions needed to make business decisions. The construction of key financial statements such as the income statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statements are studied. Computerized accounting packages will be used as the vehicle of instruction.

    XBP 3160 Human Capital Science (4)
    This course is an interdisciplinary study of the interaction of humans with the environment. It will evaluate the ecological, political, social, ethical, and economic aspects of humans’ impact on the environment. Topics include resource management, population growth, waste management, pollution, conservation, and alternative energy sources.

    XBP 3171 Human Capital Development (4)
    This course offers an introduction into the conceptual and empirical aspects of managing human resources within and organization. Topics to be covered include: staffing, training and development, compensation, and an overview of employment law.

    XBP 3180 Managerial Accounting (4)
    This course is the study of accounting functions for the benefit of managerial decision making. The preparation and use of job order and process costing systems, cost-volume profit relationships, budgeting, and production standards are studied.

    XBP 3195 Economic Issues (4)
    This course applies the economic principles introduced in XBP 3145 and concepts within economic history to issues of public policy. The course explores current economic issues including: government expenditures and revenue collection, government budgeting, fiscal policy-making, and public sector debt. Students are required to demonstrate proficiency in written communication.

    XBP 3530 Fine Arts: Traditional and Contemporary Perspectives (4)
    This course covers special topics in art, music, or theatre, with an emphasis on developing the student’s knowledge of and appreciation for selected art forms.

    XBP 4110 Statistics for Management Analysis (4)
    This course is an introduction to elementary statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability and distributions, binomial and normal distributions, hypothesis testing, and t and Chi-square distributions.

    XBP 4120 Principles of Strategic Marketing (4)
    This course offers an introduction to marketing principles and practices. Topics to be covered include consumer decision-making, segmentation and target marketing, products, promotions, and distribution.

    XBP 4130 The Dynamics of Leading Organizations (4)
    This course is an in-depth study of leadership theory and current practice. A brief overview of several of the most widely used leadership theories will be presented from a historical perspective. The differences between western leadership thought and leadership practices in other parts of the world will be discussed. Current leadership thought with its emphasis on ethical considerations including cross-cultural considerations will be developed. The student will be encouraged to begin the development of a personal leadership model that will be equally applicable with self, the family, the team, and the organization.

    XBP 4135 Operations and Technology Management (4)
    This course examines the management of operating systems in both goods manufacturing and service producing industries. Topics included are: trade-off analysis, process analysis, workplace methods, production and inventory control systems, capacity planning and operations strategies. This course makes extensive use of case studies in operations management while developing a framework for the analysis of operating systems. The course is designed to be an introduction to operations management and should accommodate the needs of those desiring an overview of operations management as well as those who are planning careers in the operations management area.

    XBP 4150 Emerging Markets in the Global Economy (4)
    This course exposes students to international business from all aspects of business management. This course presents the international economic system, the foreign exchange market, forecasting exchange rates, elements of international trade theory, international management theory, aspects of international marketing practices, and management of international economic risk, transaction risk, and translation risk.

    XBP 4165 Ethics and Work (H) (4)
    This course explores the unique moral challenges that we might confront at work or as a business in an increasingly globalized economic context. We will confront the assumptions and demands of living in a market economy, both as individual and corporate actors, and we will address some of the long-standing criticisms of the same. We will develop a deeper understanding of morally-charged economic issues, and we will examine prospective guides to help us find our way.

    XBP 4170 Financial Management (4)
    This course will provide the student with a background in financial tools and basic financial analysis. Topics to be covered include analysis of financial statements, ratio analysis, time value of money, stock, and bond valuation, capital budgeting, project analysis and evaluation, and cost of capital determination.

    XBP 4180 Legal Environment of Business (4)
    This course investigates the conduct of business practices and how these practices are determined by a philosophy of living. Models of excellence will be examined as well as ethical failures in the conduct of business. Issues of personal character and corporate integrity will be interwoven with argument analysis, business theory, and case study.

    XBP 4190 Strategic Decisions and Market Outcomes (4)
    This capstone course helps the student develop sound judgment based on the ability to integrate current knowledge and to understand the environment, external circumstances, internal strengths and weaknesses, and self. Many of the functional tools of business will be integrated in this course where there will be significant emphasis on case study.

    XBP 4500 Special Topics (4)
    This course presents special topics related to the OLM program. May be repeated a maximum of two times. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Offered periodically based upon student need.


Post-Baccalaureate and Master’s Programs

Post-Baccalaureate

Welcome to the teacher education program, where we prepare teachers to be reflective practitioners. Reflective practitioners value diversity, engage in liberating practice, and are lifelong learners.

We offer programs at both the undergraduate and master’s level. The following education programs are approved by the North Carolina State Board of Education and the Department of Public Instruction for licensure of our graduates to teach at the early childhood, elementary, middle, or secondary levels.

Undergraduate/initial licensure areas:

  • Birth through Kindergarten
  • Elementary (K-6)
  • Middle Grades Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies (6-9)
  • Comprehensive Science (9-12)
  • Comprehensive Social Studies (9-12)
  • English (9-12)
  • Mathematics (9-12)
  • Art (K-12)
  • Health and Physical Education (K-12)
  • Music (K-12)
  • Spanish (K-12)
  • Special Education General and Adapted Curriculum (K-12)
  • Theatre (K-12)

Graduate/M.Ed. licensure areas:

  • Birth through Kindergarten
  • Elementary (K-6)
  • Special Education General and Adapted Curriculum (K-12)

Our graduates have good reputations in the field.  Many have been named “teacher of the year” and have achieved national board certification in their states and districts. Many serve in leadership roles in professional organizations and schools.  Of our graduates, about two-thirds remain in North Carolina for their first year of teaching.

Rebecca F. Blomgren, Ed.D.   Pamela J. Bennett
Director of Teacher Education   Assistant Director of Teacher Education
(336) 272-7102, ext. 5262   (336)217-7236 Fax: (336) 217-7264
blomgrenr@greensboro.edu   bennettp@greensboro.edu

To apply, download, fill out and submit this application. Also, download this form and ask a reference to fill it out and return it, following the instructions on the form. 

Licensure Only

Greensboro College offers licensure only programs in fourteen different areas for individuals who have a bachelor’s degree and are interested in teaching. The college also offers masters degree programs in Birth through Kindergarten, Elementary Education and Special Education.

Licensure Only Application Form –Download and Print. Reference Form: Download and Print.

Accreditation

Both the undergraduate and graduate licensure programs are approved by the North Carolina Board of Education and the Department of Public Instruction. Licensure areas include birth through kindergarten; elementary (K-6); middle grades (6-9) language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies; secondary (9-12) biology, comprehensive science, comprehensive social studies, English, and mathematics; and K-12 programs in art, health and physical education, music, Spanish, special education (adapted and general curriculum), and theatre.


Graduate Licensure Programs

The Master of Education degree in Birth through Kindergarten, Elementary and Special Education is designed to serve individuals who hold a valid teaching license in the licensure area and wish to pursue a master’s degree. Successful completion of the Master of Education degree qualifies the individual for the master’s license in the state of North Carolina. The Master of Education in Special Education offers concentrations in two areas: Adapted Curriculum and General Curriculum.

For individuals interested in obtaining a master’s degree but do not have an initial teaching license, the College offers a two-step program. The first step leads to initial licensure and the second step leads to the M.Ed. and a master’s license. For more information about this two-step program, refer to the Licensure Plus M.Ed. Program section in the Graduate Academic Catalog.

For specific information about the program you are interested in, contact the program coordinator listed below.

Licensure Area Program Coordinator Contact Information
Birth through Kindergarten Dr. Susan Connelly sconnelly@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5414
Elementary Dr. Debra Davidson dmdavidson@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5266
Special Education Dr. Natasha Veale natasha.veale@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext 5355


Piedmont Alternative Licensure Program

The Piedmont Alternative Licensure (PAL) Program began as a collaborative project between Greensboro College and Bennett College to provide the professional education sequence needed for teacher licensure and a support network for lateral entry candidates.

PAL licensure areas include birth through kindergarten; middle grades language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies, secondary biology, comprehensive science, comprehensive social studies, English, and mathematics; and K-12 art, music, health and physical education, Spanish, and theatre. For more information contact Dr. Rebecca Blomgren, professor of education and founding dean, School of Social Sciences and Education, at blomgrenr@greensboro.edu or 336-272-7102, ext 5262.


Resources

For specific information about the program you are interested in, contact the program coordinator listed below.

Licensure Area Program Coordinator Contact Information
Birth through Kindergarten Dr. Susan Connelly sconnelly@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext.5414
Elementary (K-6) Dr. Debra Davidson dmdavidson@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5266
Middle Grades (6-9)
    Language Arts
    Mathematics
    Science
    Social Studies
 

Dr. Rebecca Blomgren
Dr. Kathleen Keating
Dr. Stuart Davidson
Professor Marjorie Larkin
Dr. Allison Palmadessa

blomgrenr@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5262
keatingk@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5308
davidsons@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5294
larkinm@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5364
allison.palmadessa@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5325

Biology (9-12) Professor Marjorie Larkin larkinm@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5364
Comprehensive Science (9-12) Professor Marjorie Larkin larkinm@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5364
Comprehensive Social Studies (9-12) Dr. Allison Palmadessa apalmadessa@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5325
English (9-12) Dr. Kathleen Keating keatingk@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5308
Mathematics (9-12) Dr. Stuart Davidson davidsons@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5294
Art (K-12) Professor James Langer langerj@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5361
Health and Physical Education Dr. Randy Hunt huntr@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5247
Music (K-12) Dr. Jane McKinney mckinneyj@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5281
Spanish (K-12) Dr. Rebecca Blomgren blomgrenr@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5262
Special Education (K-12) Dr. Natasha Veale natasha.veale@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5355
Theatre (K-12) Professor David Schram schramd@greensboro.edu; 336-272-7102, ext. 5243

PAL application: download. Reference form: download.

 

PAL (Piedmont Alternative Licensure) Program

PAL is an accelerated program leading to licensure in one of these areas: 

  • Middle Grades Science, Social Studies, Mathematics and Language Arts
  • Secondary Grades Biology, Comprehensive Science, English, Mathematics and Social Studies
  • K-12 Art
  • K-12 Music
  • K-12 Health & Physical Education
  • K-12 Spanish
  • K-12 Theatre

What is the Piedmont Alternative Licensure Program?

The PAL Program is an accelerated program for individuals with a bachelor’s degree who are seeking teacher licensure in the following areas:

  • middle grades science, social studies, mathematics, and language arts
  • secondary biology, comprehensive science, English, mathematics, and social studies
  • K-12 art, music, health & physical education, Spanish, and theatre.

The PAL Program for Middle Grades, Secondary and K-12 Teachers:

The PAL program is a 17-semester-hour program consisting of 5 PAL courses and a Practicum that are offered during the summer and spring semesters. PAL candidates also complete an additional content-area pedagogy course in the fall.

Am I eligible?

An eligible candidate:

  • receives preference if he/she is employed as a school teacher in an N.C. public or SACS-accredited institution.
  • has earned a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university and has completed a major or concentration in an area that matches employment or intended employment.
  • has at least a 2.5 GPA on all college/university work, or has met N.C. Department of Public Instruction lateral-entry employment requirements.
  • takes and satisfies the PRAXIS criteria in reading, writing, and mathematics if required for lateral-entry employment or if GPA is below 2.5.

How much does the PAL Program cost?

  • All PAL-designated courses (e.g., PAL 4000) are offered at a reduced rate of $235 per credit hour for 2014-15.
  • Additional courses needed beyond the PAL courses will be assessed at the current adult-education rate of $325 per credit hour for 2014-15, plus a $50 fee.
  • Individual payment plans may be arranged through the Greensboro College Business Office. Financial aid may also be available through the Greensboro College Financial Aid Office.

How does the PAL candidate obtain a license?

A PAL candidate is eligible for licensure recommendation after she/he has:

  • been admitted to the Greensboro College Teacher Education Program as a PAL candidate.
  • completed successfully the sequential PAL Program courses.
  • taken and satisfied the Specialty Area PRAXIS exams.
  • satisfied the student-teaching and technology requirements through employment or coursework.

How do I apply?

Download, complete and submit this application. Also, download this form and ask a reference to fill it in and return it, following the instructions on the form.

For further information about the PAL Program, contact:

Rebecca F. Blomgren, Ph.D., Professor of Education and founding dean, School of Social Sciences and Education
336-272-7102, ext. 5262
blomgrenr@greensboro.edu

What comprises the PAL sequence?

Six courses (17 credit hours), structured sequentially in a 12-month developmental experience:

  • Five-course, five-week, intensive preservice training experience in June and July
  • Institution of School (3 hrs)*
  • Literacy in the Content Area (3 hrs)*
  • Nature of the Learner (3 hrs)*
  • Classroom Management/Planning and Instruction (3 hrs)*
  • Teaching Children with Special Needs in the Regular Classroom (3 hrs)*

*Meets Regional Area Learning Center competency requirement

  • A semester-long clinical experience in the candidate’s classroom
  • Clinical Practicum (2 hrs)

In addition to the PAL sequence, candidates complete the following NCDPI requirements:

  • Fall semester: Pedagogy course in the student’s specific content area (for example, K-12 Art, 9-12 English, etc.) (4 hours)
  • EDU 2100 – usually offered every semester (2 hours)

Candidates who are not lateral entry teachers are required to take:

  • EDU 3100 (4 hours) – offered every semester
  • EDU 4990 (8 hours) – Student Teaching

PAL participants form a close-knit cadre during the intensive summer programs. During the following teaching year, participants have access to a professional liaison.

Are other courses required for licensure?

Possibly. The six PAL courses, pedagogy course and EDU 2200 cover the “professional studies” needed for licensure. Depending upon the candidate’s college degree, some additional coursework in the content area of teaching may be necessary to fulfill state competencies (e.g., middle grade social studies licensure candidates must take a cultural geography class; secondary mathematics candidates need a class in geometry, etc.).

PAL is an accelerated program leading to teacher licensure in middle grades science, social studies, mathematics, or language arts; secondary biology, comprehensive science, English, mathematics, or social studies; or K-12 art, music, health & physical education, Spanish or theatre.

PAL (Piedmont Alternative Licensure) Program:

* Birth – Kindergarten

What is the Piedmont Alternative Licensure Program?

The PAL Program is an accelerated teacher licensure program. The PAL Program for Birth-Kindergarten Teachers is a 6 course, 17 semester hour sequence (summer semester courses and spring clinical practicum) designed exclusively and especially for teachers already teaching in publicly funded preschool or early intervention programs.

Am I eligible?

An eligible candidate

  • is employed as a teacher in a publicly funded preschool or early intervention program
  • has earned a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university
  • has at least a 2.5 GPA on all college/university work

How much does the PAL Program cost?

  • PAL is currently offered at a reduced rate of $235 per credit hour.
  • Additional courses needed beyond the 17 credit-hour PAL courses (any without a PAL prefix) will be assessed at the current adult-education rate of $325 per credit hour, plus a $50 fee.
  • Individual payment plans may be arranged through the Greensboro College Business Office. Financial Aid may also be available through the Greensboro College Financial Aid Office.

Is financial assistance available?

Yes. The TEACH Birth-Kindergarten scholarship may pay up to 80% of tuition and fees for qualified students. Contact Mildryann Hatten at 919-967-3272 for more information.

Financial Aid may also be available.; Contact the Greensboro College Financial Aid Office.

How does the PAL candidate obtain a license?

A PAL candidate is eligible for licensure recommendation after she/he has:

  • been admitted to the Greensboro College Teacher Education Program as a PAL candidate.
  • successfully completed the sequential PAL Program courses.
  • satisfied the student teaching and technology requirements through employment in a state-funded preschool or early intervention program

How do I apply?

Download, fill out and submit this application. Also, download this form and ask a reference to fill it out and return it, following the instructions on the form.

Course of Study

Summer Semester:

PAL 4500—Infant and Toddler Development, Planning and Methods (3 credit hours)

PAL 4700—Language and Literacy Development in Young Children (3 credit hours)

PAL 4900—Technology and Assessment in Early Childhood (3 credit hours)

PAL 4600—Social and Emotional Development and Guidance of Behavior in Young Children (3 credit hours)

PAL 4800—Serving Young Children with Disabilities (3 credit hours)

Fall semester:

BKE 3740/3741—Curriculum and Methods for Preschool and Kindergarten & Fieldwork (4 credit hours) (This course is not included in the PAL tuition and will be billed at the Professional & Graduate Studies rate of $310/credit hour.)

Spring semester:

PAL 4980—Clinical Practicum (2 credit hours)

Usually offered every semester:

EDU 2100 — 21st Century Schools (2 credit hours) (This course is not included in the PAL tuition and will be billed at the Professional & Graduate Studies rate of $400/credit hour.) PAL participants form a close-knit cadre during the intensive summer programs. During the following teaching year, participants have access to a professional liaison. Candidates not employed as lead teachers also will complete field work for 1 credit.

The Birth-Kindergarten PAL program is an accelerated program leading to licensure in B-K education.

Piedmont Alternative Licensure (PAL) Program: Special Education/Adapted Curriculum

What is the Piedmont Alternative Licensure Program?

The PAL Program is an accelerated teacher-licensure program. The PAL Program for Special Education-Adapted is a six-course, 20 semester-hour sequence (summer semester courses and spring clinical practicum) designed for teachers already teaching in public schools. Post-bac candidate not currently employed as teachers are welcome to apply.

Am I eligible?

An eligible candidate:

  • Is employed as a teacher in a public school.
  • has earned a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university and has completed a major or concentration in an area that matches employment or intended employment.
  • has at least a 2.5 GPA on all college/university work, or has met NCDPI lateral-entry requirements.
  • has taken and satisfied the Core Academic Skills for Educators in reading, writing and mathematics if required for lateral entry.

Although currently employed lateral-entry teachers will receive priority for acceptance into PAL, non-teaching candidates may apply to the Adapted PAL program if they have a cumulative 2.5 grade-point average in their undergraduate degree. They will be required to take other professional studies courses in addition to the Adapted PAL program if they are not employed within a year of completing the summer PAL courses and intend to student teach, after finishing all Adapted PAL and prescribed coursework.

How much does the PAL Program cost?

  • PAL is currently offered at a reduced rate of $235 per credit hour.
  • Additional courses needed beyond the 20 credit-hour PAL courses (any without a PAL prefix) will be assessed at the current adult-education rate of $325 per credit hour, plus a $35 application fee.
  • Individual payment plans may be arranged through the Greensboro College Business Office. Financial aid also may be available through the Greensboro College Financial Aid Office.

How does the PAL candidate obtain a license?

A PAL candidate is eligible for licensure recommendation after she/he has:

  • been admitted to the Greensboro College Teacher Education Program as a PAL candidate.
  • successfully completed the sequential PAL Program courses.
  • satisfied the student teaching/clinical practicum.

How do I apply?

Download, fill out and submit this application. Also, download this form and ask a reference to fill it out and return it, following the instructions on the form.

Course of Study

Usually offered every semester:

EDU 2100 — 21st Century Schools (2 credit hours) (This course is not included in the PAL tuition and will be billed at the Professional & Graduate Studies rate of $325/credit hour). Candidates not employed as lead teachers also will complete field work for 1 credit.

EDU 3100-Intro to Technology, Planning and Assessment- (post-bac candidates NOT employed as teachers) (4 credit hours) (This course is not included in the PAL tuition and will be billed at the Professional & Graduate Studies rate of $325/credit hour).

*Summer Semester:

PAL 3000/3001- Individuals with Low-Incidence Disabilities & Fieldwork- (this fieldwork will not be required if employed as an adapted teacher) (4 credit hours)

PAL 3100- Educational Assessment and Behavioral Interventions for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities (3 credit hours)

PAL 3200- Medical and Health Management of Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities (3 credit hours)

PAL 3300-Assistive Technology in Special Education (3 credit hours)

PAL 3400-Transitions, Life Skills and Career Options (3 credit hours)

Fall semester:

SPE 3770/3771—Emergent Literacy Methods and Assessment & Fieldwork (4 credit hours) (This course is not included in the PAL tuition and will be billed at the Professional & Graduate Studies rate of $325/credit hour.)

Spring semester:

PAL 4930-Practicum Seminar (2 credit hours)

PAL 4980—Clinical Practicum (classroom teachers) (2 credit hours) OR

EDU 4930-Student Teaching Seminar

EDU4990- Student Teaching (post-bac candidates NOT employed as teachers) (8 credit hours)

*Tuition for PAL courses is $235 per credit hours unless otherwise noted.

 

 

The PAL program in Special Education/Adapted Curriculum is an accelerated program leading to licensure in special education/adapted curriculum

Licensure Plus

Licensure Plus is a two-step program leading to initial licensure and then to a master’s degree. 

The program is designed for individuals who have a bachelor’s degree but who did not major in education, and who now want to teach.

Greensboro College offers:

  • Small, informal classes
  • Flexible scheduling of classes
  • Evening classes back to back
  • Full summer schedule of classes
  • Transfer for up to 9 graduate credits

Special Education

STEP ONE leads to initial licensure:

  • Standard Professional 1 License (SP1) in Special Education – General Curriculum or Special Education/Adapted Curriculum

STEP TWO leads to

  • M.Ed. in Special Education/General Curriculum or Special Education/Adapted Curriculum
  • Advanced licensure

Special Education General Curriculum admission requirements and curriculum  

Special Education Adapted Curriculum admission requirements and curriculum  

Elementary Education

The Two Steps of the Elementary Education Licensure Plus Program: STEP ONE (40-48 credit hours) leads to initial licensure:

  • Standard Professional 1 License (SP1) in Elementary Education

STEP TWO (22-24 credit hours) leads to

  • M.Ed. in Elementary Education
  • Advanced licensure

Elementary Education admission requirements and curriculum  

Apply

Licensure Plus Application form (download and print)  

Licensure Plus Reference Assessment (download and print)  

Licensure Plus is a two-step program leading to initial licensure and then a master’s degree.

Certificate Programs

Graduate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

This 15-to-18 graduate semester-hour program leads to a Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages and is designed to prepare candidates to teach English to speakers of other languages abroad.

The 18-hour certificate also enables candidates who already have a Master of Arts degree in another field such as English to teach ESOL at post-secondary institutions. The required coursework covers language teaching methodology, the nature of language, the structure of English, second-language acquisition, intercultural communication, and a practicum experience. The 15-18 graduate semester hours required for the certificate may be applied toward the M.A. in TESOL at Greensboro College.

Note: The certificate is not equivalent to the M.A. degree, nor does the Certificate carry teaching licensure.

For more information, please contact:

Elena King, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English and TESOL
Associate Director, TESOL Program 336-272-7102, ext. 5750
elena.king@greensboro.edu

Master’s

The Master of Arts in Teaching English To Speakers of Other Languages (M.A. TESOL)

2016 MA-TESOL program participants

Whether you hope to teach English to non-native speakers in a community college, institute of higher education, nonprofit organization, K-12 context, or abroad — an M.A. from Greensboro College can help you achieve your dreams.

 

Overview

If you enjoy being in an educational setting and learning about different cultures, you should consider a Master of Arts degree in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at Greensboro College. With a Master’s in TESOL, you will be qualified to apply for full-time teaching positions in a variety of academic settings including community colleges, private language academies, K-12 schools*, university-based intensive English programs, and non-profit service organizations.

For those who crave adventure, there are exciting, attractive jobs teaching English around the world with good salaries, paid travel expenses, subsidized housing, paid vacation and health insurance. Greensboro College can help get you there.

Our M.A. in TESOL is the credential that English language employers seek and it will open doors far beyond that of a TESOL certificate program.  Our core curriculum seeks a balance between working with adults and working with children, with the goal of preparing our graduates for a variety of teaching contexts. Specialized elective courses allow you to customize the program to meet your individual needs.

Founded in 2001, this 30-semester-hour program consists of:

  • 15 hours of language and culture,
  • 9 hours of pedagogy, and
  • 6 hours of research

Other special features:

  • Work at your own pace — including a fast-track option. Studies may be completed in four consecutive semesters (13 months) or at a more relaxed pace, if that is what you choose.
  • Courses in the fall and spring semesters are offered online, with a face-to-face residential component in the summer months.
  • Residential program includes a five-week summer session from late June to end of July with affordable room and board.
  • Students who are unable to attend the summer session in Greensboro have the option to complete the program entirely online.

Learn more at our Facebook page!

About Us

Founded in 1838, Greensboro College provides undergraduate students a true liberal-arts education while also offering four master’s degrees. Greensboro College provides a coeducational and independent learning atmosphere with approximately 1,000 undergraduate students from 29 states and territories, the District of Columbia, and seven foreign countries. We have 45 full-time faculty who teach 32 majors and more than 1,000 different courses directly to our students. We pride ourselves on our one-on-one contact between faculty and students, with no graduate assistants or teaching assistants teaching courses at Greensboro. We consider ourselves a leader in academic advising and leadership development programs. Greensboro College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Dr. Michelle Plaisance, TESOL Program Director

Dr. Plaisance fell in love with the world of TESOL during her undergraduate studies in Quito, Ecuador and Heredia, Costa Rica. Forced to eventually settle in one hemisphere, she pursued her MAT in TESL from the University of North Carolina in Charlotte. After some years of experience as an ESL teacher in NC public schools, she returned to UNCC to pursue her doctorate in Urban Literacy, with a TESOL concentration. Dr. Plaisance joined Greensboro College in 2014 as the program director and assistant professor of English and TESOL. She’s passionate about learning and life-long education, which makes her job in graduate studies one of her greatest pleasures.

 

Professor Jane Girardi, TESOL Program Assistant Director

Prof. Girardi has been part of Greensboro College’s MA-TESOL Program since its inception in 2001. She began her TESOL teaching career at High Point University, offering foundational ESL courses to international students. At Greensboro College she has worked with Admissions and advising for adult programs and designed the first courses in Educational Inquiry and Current Issues in TESOL. A past member of International TESOL, FLANC, ACTFL and AATG, she served as chair of the Higher Ed Section of the Advisory Board of Carolina TESOL. Although officially retired, Professor Girardi continues as Assistant Director of the MA-TESOL Program and teaches Current Issues in TESOL.

 

Dr. Abby Dobs, TESOL Instructor

Abby Dobs has been teaching and studying English since her days as an undergraduate student. Her work, as a teacher and a student, is motivated by a respect for the power of language and the belief that greater knowledge and awareness of language use in social practices may ultimately lead to change—at the societal, institutional, or personal level.

She taught eighth grade English in Concord, N.C., for seven years, while completing her M.A. in English from UNC Charlotte at night. Since then, she has taught ESL composition and grammar courses at the college level, and she completed her Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from Penn State University. Dobs also serves as editorial assistant for the Journal of Language Aggression and Conflict.

Her research focuses on the interactional practices involved in classroom teaching and learning. At present she is exploring how an ESL teacher fosters second language motivation and learning through playful classroom interaction.

Prof. Degania Fortson, TESOL Instructor

Prof. Fortson received her M.A. in TESOL from Greensboro College and her B.A. from the University of Georgia. She also holds an M.A. in early childhood education but primarily focuses on adult instruction. She is currently teaching in community literacy programs in the Triangle area.

Degania has lived most of her life abroad and taught in a number of diplomatic, international communities. Her TESOL-related research interests explore the transformation of individual identity within a multilingual/multicultural context and the evolution of the global citizen. Her educational research interests include metacognition and the multiple brain functions leveraged in the learning process that collaborate to form unique learning profiles.

She is raising three “Third Culture Kids” and hoping to impart on them global competence and cultural intelligence.

Dr. Kathy J. Lyday, TESOL Instructor

Dr. Lyday teaches first-year writing, linguistics, grammar, history of the English language, American literature, literature of the Holocaust, and Appalachian literature on a regular basis at Elon University in Elon, NC, where she has taught for 33 years.  During the past several summers, she has taught applied and descriptive linguistics and grammar in the Masters of TESOL program at Greensboro College. After finishing her Bachelor’s and Master’s in English at Tennessee Technological University, she completed a PhD at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in American literature and with special emphasis areas on English language studies and modern literature.

Dr. Elena King, Associate Director of TESOL and Assistant Professor of English and TESOL

Dr. King joined Greensboro College as a part-time instructor in 2014 and was named to the full-time faculty in 2016. She received her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina in Charlotte.  Her research interests include teacher perceptions of immigrant students and the language sharing of English learners in urban secondary schools.  She has worked as a University Supervisor for TESL candidates, ESL instructor in an intensive English language program, adjunct faculty in the College of Education at UNC Charlotte, and in middle and secondary public schools as an ESL teacher.  

Professor Paula Wilder, TESOL Instructor

Prof. Wilder received her MA in TESOL from Greensboro College and her BA in English from Guilford College. She currently serves as the director of academic English as a foreign language at Durham Technical Community College. Paula has been responsible for the creation and implementation of academic EFL curriculum programs at two community colleges in NC and is working as a consultant for other community colleges who are in the process of implementing their EFL programs. She is also an instructor in the TESOL certificate program at NC State and has taught at Harvard University’s Institute of English Language. In 2014, Paula received the TESOL International Ruth Cryme’s Award and was a runner-up in the 2016 TESOL International Teacher of the Year Award. She has presented her research in a variety of venues, including NC Community College System Office Conferences, SETESOL, Carolina TESOL, TALGs, NCADE, NCEI. In her free time, Paula enjoys hiking, kayaking, and gardening. She is an avid reader and enjoys all genres.  She also has four children who range in ages from 19 to 24.

Dr. Timothy Sims, TESOL Instructor

Dr. Sims serves as the Director of Federal Programs for Hickory Public Schools where he supervises the oversight and implementation of multiple federal programs including Title I, English as a Second Language and Career and Technical Education. Dr. Sims has contributed to numerous NC initiatives including the K-2 Literacy Assessment Task Force, the Ready Schools Task Force, the Kindergarten Think Tank, the ELL Support Team, as well as the development of the NC English Language Proficiency Standards. Through the years, Dr. Sims has developed and provided professional development to educators from throughout the state covering such subject areas as literacy, English language learners, and school reform. Dr. Sims completed a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. He earned his Master of School Administration from Appalachian State University and a Bachelor of Arts from Le Moyne College.

 

Dr. Erin Callahan, TESOL Instructor

Dr. Callahan teaches classes in linguistics, TESOL, and English Education at Western Carolina University.  Her research centers on morphosyntactic and phonological variation in emerging varieties of Hispanicized English (HE) in North Carolina. She received her B.A. in Linguistics at Yale University, where she did fieldwork in the French West Indies on Guadeloupe Creole. She earned her M.A. in English from N.C. State, and her Ph.D. in English (Linguistics) from Duke. She grew up in Charlotte (N.C.) and is a proud, native North Carolinian. She has taught high school Spanish, French, and ESL in the NC public schools, and EFL (English as a Foreign Language) at the Summer Institute in English at NC State University as well as at a bilingual school in Querétaro, México. She enjoys documentary movies, vegetarian cooking– and this summer, with some trepidation, plans to finally take sewing lessons!


 

 

Courses

 

M.A. TESOL Curriculum

ENG 5300 English Grammar: Students learn about American English through traditional, functional, and descriptive grammar approaches. Syntax, semantics, dialectology, linguistic geography, and usage are also discussed. (Required)

ENG 5310 General Linguistics: Student learn the basic principles of language study, including a history of the English language. Among the topics covered are word origins; linguistic developments; the study of dialect, structure and meaning, and the social use of language; first and subsequent language acquisition. This course  also examines the influence of power, race, class, and gender on the development of languages through and across time. (Required)

ENG 5320 Practicum in Applied Linguistics: This field experience provides multiple opportunities to evaluate and assess linguistic competence and performance in native and non-native English speakers and plan appropriate curriculum and materials. Focus is on morphological, phonological, syntactic, and semantic systems in the diverse, multilingual and/or multidialectal classroom. (Elective)

ENG 5330 Language and Culture: Students examine the interaction of language and society. Topics include cross-cultural communication; national language policies; multicultural verbal and non-verbal behavior, customs and traditions; prestige language; gender, ethnic, political, and class issues in sociolinguistics. (Elective)

ENG 5420 Current Issues in TESOL: Students explore legal and cultural issues affecting the teaching of English as a second language. Laws concerning immigration, school policy and ESOL students, and cultural differences affecting teaching and learning, are among topics covered. (Required) 

ENG 5500 Special Topics in TESOL: Each semester, one or more special topics are introduced to the TESOL curriculum based on students’ needs and interests. Examples of recent special topics include Academic Writing for the English Learner, Authentic Assessment, and The Adult English Learner. (Elective)

ENG 5430 Reading and Writing for the English Language Learner: Among topics covered are  reading and composition theory; curriculum; purpose, audience, structure and development of texts; modes of discourse; L1 and subsequent language acquisition and learning; assessment and evaluation; direct instruction and interventions; issues related to ELL students and families from various language typologies and levels of competency in written and spoken English; special populations, exceptionalities and technology. (Required)

ENG 6310 Descriptive Linguistics: This courses surveys contemporary models of linguistic analysis, application to a wide diversity of natural languages, and evaluation of universal and cross-cultural application Students are acquainted with the general principles of descriptive linguistics including phonetics, regional and social dialects, cultural and social aspects of language, gender issues in language, slang, euphemism/taboo, and semantics. (Elective)

ENG 6500 Pedagogy of TESOL: Students learn about oral and written language and content-specific approaches to language instruction and the English language learner: lesson planning; curriculum design; evaluation; assessment; technology; test design; special populations; reflective practices; legal issues; family literacy; social service; human resources; state and federal programs; integration of content; and bilingual education. (Required)

ENG 6510 Practicum in Pedagogy of TESOL: The practicum provides the opportunity for students to apply theoretical, philosophical, and research-based study in the field of TESOL and to demonstrate through a series of assignments the skills, strategies, and best practices related to language, culture, pedagogy, curriculum, and assessment. It also provides students a further opportunity to reflect upon their work as professionals and continue their cycle of learning. (Required)

EDU 6150 Introduction to Educational Inquiry (Research): This course introduces students to educational inquiry and research methodologies at the graduate level. The course is intended to increase the students’ ability to read critically, to synthesize the products of educational inquiry, to conceptualize research issues, and to conduct a clear, disciplined inquiry into a topic. (Required)

ENG 6900 Teacher as Researcher and Practitioner: Final Project: This capstone course offers students the opportunity to design and develop a product (e.g., teaching aids such as curriculum design and materials; interactive website; in-service training workshop, etc.) to help facilitate and promote English language teaching and learning for speakers of other languages worldwide. Students will continue to deepen their understanding of educational inquiry and research methodologies, strengthen their ability to read critically, to synthesize and conceptualize research issues, and conduct a clear, disciplined inquiry into a topic. (Required)

 

Admission

The MA TESOL program operates on a rolling admissions program. Apply when you are ready to start and join us for the next available session.

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree from accredited institution
  • Undergraduate GPA 3.0 or higher
  • BA in the US: Satisfactory score the GRE or MAT
  • BA outside the US: Satisfactory score on the TOEFL, IELTS, or ITEP
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Writing sample
 

Step 1: Complete the Application

TESOL application and reference forms (click to download) (Or click here to apply online)

Readmit form (click to download)

Application for non-degree-seeking students (click to download)

Step 2: Send Documents to our Admissions Department
  • $35 application fee
  • Letters of Recommendation
  • Writing Sample
  • Official Test Scores – sent from testing company
  • Official Transcripts (sealed)
  • Official Transcript Evaluations sent from NACES-approved agency
  • Photocopy of visa for International Students

Document may be emailed to adults@greensboro.edu or mailed to Greensboro College Admissions, 815 W. Market St., Greensboro, NC 27401

Greensboro College now also offers a graduate certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

TESOL/Applied Linguistics Graduate Student Conference

Save the date!

Greensboro College is excited to collaborate with East Carolina University on the TALGS conference on February 11, 2017. Organized by the Linguistics and TESOL graduate students and faculty, TALGS aims to provide a serious but relaxed environment for graduate students and professionals working in TESL/TEFL/FL and a variety of applied linguistics fields to present their work, receive feedback, and network. The TALGS Conference provides graduate students as well as TESOL and other Foreign Language professionals (including ESOL, TESL, EFL, ESL, TEFL, Spanish, French, German, DLI, etc.) a forum to showcase their research and successful teaching practices. TALGS is committed to bettering the educational experiences of language learners in the community by providing a comfortable environment where an interaction between theory/research and practice/teaching is possible.

Click here to register!

All attendees must register by sending in the registration form available above. Pre-registration is completed only when accompanied by a payment (address on form) by the designated deadline. Pre-registration ends on Friday, January 23, 2016.

January 15, 2017

Pre-Registration Deadline
ECU and Greensboro College Community: $20.00
All other attendees: $30.00

February 11, 2017

Registration at the Door
ECU and Greensboro College Community: $30.00
All other attendees: $40.00

Send registration to:

Dr. Michelle Plaisance
Department of English
Greensboro College
Cowan Humanities Building
815 W. Market Street
Greensboro, NC 27401
NOTE: Teachers will receive Continuing Education Units (CEUs) for attending TALGS.
 

 

Graduates

Where Greensboro College TESOL graduates are teaching:

 


View Greensboro College M.A. TESOL Alumni in a larger map

 

Contact Us

Michelle Plaisance, Ph.D.
TESOL Director
Tel.: 336-272-7102, ext. 5285

Elena King, Ph.D.
TESOL Associate Director
336-272-7102, ext. 5750

Jane Girardi, M.A.
TESOL Assistant Director
Tel.: 336-272-7102, ext. 5302

TESOL@greensboro.edu

For general and application information:

Office of Admissions
(336) 217-7284
(336) 217-7238 [fax]
adults@greensboro.edu

Office Hours

8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday

M.Ed. Elementary Education, Special Education General Curriculum or Special Education Adapted Curriculum

Graduate Programs in Education

This program is designed for licensed teachers who wish to:

  • Earn a master’s license,
  • Further their professional development, and
  • Pursue National Board Certification

Offers:

  • Small, informal classes
  • Designed to be completed in 18 months
  • Evening classes back to back
  • Full summer schedule of classes
  • Transfer for up to 9 grad credits

Admission Requirements:

  • Bachelor’s degree from accredited institution
  • Official transcript from any institutions from which the applicant seeks to transfer credits.
  • Grade-point average of 3.0 or higher at the undergraduate level
  • Satisfactory score on the GRE or MAT
  • a valid and active NC SP1 license in the appropriate teaching area
  • submission of an essay
  • Two letters of recommendation

Exit Criteria:

  • 3.0 GPA with no more than one C; no grade of F
  • Presentation of Research

Programs leading to the M.Ed. for those individuals seeking a first license or Standard Profession 1 (SP1) licensure are also available.

Tuition is competitively priced at $400 per graduate credit hour.

Download an application and recommendation form.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (30 hours)

Professional Studies  

EDU 6110   Introduction to Educational Research  (3)

EDU 6310   School, Community, and Family Collaboration  (3)

EDU 6580   Current Issues in Education  (3)

EDU 6900   Teacher as Researcher: Research Implementation (3)

SPE 5280   Exceptionality, Diversity, and Difference  (3)

Specialty Studies 

ELE 6330   Multicultural Literature for Children  (3)

ELE 6340   Cultural Aspects of Effective Teaching  (3)

ELE 6770   Differentiated Instruction  (3)

Choose two of the following:

ELE 6500   Topical Seminar  (3)

ENG 5310   General Linguistics  (3) 

ENG 5330   Language and Culture  (3)

ENG 6500   The Pedagogy of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages  (3)  

SPECIAL EDUCATION GENERAL CURRICULUM (30 hours)

Professional Studies 

EDU 6110   Introduction to Educational Research  (3)

EDU 6310   School, Community, and Family Collaboration  (3) 

EDU 6580   Current Issues in Education  (3)

EDU 6900   Teacher as Researcher: Implementation of Research (3)  

Specialty Studies 

SPE 5280   Exceptionality, Diversity and Difference  (3)

SPE 6320   Classroom Assessment, Teaching, and Learning Strategies in Special Education  (3)

SPE 6330   Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education (3)

SPE 6340   Research-based Literacy Methods  (3) 

Choose two of the following:

ENG 5310   General Linguistics (3)

ENG 5330   Language and Culture (3)

ENG 6500   The Pedagogy of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3)

ELE 6330   Multicultural Literature for Children (3)

SPE 6400   Strategies for Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)

SPE 6420   Assistive Technology to Support Literacy and Communication (3)

SPECIAL EDUCATION ADAPTED CURRICULUM (30 hours)

Professional Studies  

EDU 6110   Introduction to Educational Research  (3)

EDU 6310   School, Community, and Family Collaboration  (3) 

EDU 6580   Current Issues in Education  (3)

EDU 6900   Teacher as Researcher: Research Implementation (3)

Specialty Studies 

SPE 6330   Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education (3)

SPE 6400   Strategies for Teaching Students with Autism  (3)

SPE 6420   Assistive Technology to Support Literacy and Communication  (3)

SPE 6440   Supporting Students with Serious Medical Issues and Their Families  (3)

Choose two of the following:

ENG 5310   General Linguistics (3)

ENG 5330   Language and Culture (3)

ENG 6500   The Pedagogy of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3)

SPE 6340   Research-Based Literacy Methods (3)

Master’s Degree (M.Ed.) in Birth-Kindergarten Education

Birth-Kindergarten Education is one of three M.Ed. master’s programs offered by Greensboro College. Each program has its specialty studies component taught by individuals in that or related disciplines. The professional studies common to all licensure areas are taught by the faculty in the Division of Education. The professional and specialty studies component of the master’s programs are vitally interlinked.

Competencies required for initial licensure are at a basic level.. Content in the graduate courses includes a more in-depth study of basic concepts and requires the candidate to examine historical, psychological, sociological and philosophical issues as well as current trends in education. The master curriculum provides opportunities for candidates to become actively involved in identifying programs researching these problems and subsequently making needed changes in public school classrooms. The curriculum expands the knowledge base of the teachers so they can begin to think in terms of best practices and reflect upon their own professional instructional growth and leadership development. The master curriculum leads candidates to become critical and reflective practitioners who examine best practices from a perspective of equity and inclusion.

The graduate program builds upon but extends the initial “A” licensure requirements for candidates in a number of specific ways. First, the graduate program emphasizes research by requiring candidates to interpret, judge the quality of and apply research findings to actual classroom issues. Graduate candidates demonstrate their knowledge of research through case study analysis and action research projects. Second, the graduate program focuses upon professional development and leadership skills. Graduate candidates demonstrate their growth in these areas through self-selected initiatives and community involvement. Third, the graduate program concentrates upon understanding oneself as a learner, teacher and leader. Graduate candidates engage in ongoing reflection upon practice, learn to work collaboratively with colleagues, and learn to use assessment to study their practice in systematic ways to guide their decision making. Ultimately, the graduate program is designed to guide and recognize teacher development.

The Birth-Kindergarten Program courses and instructional experiences are designed with guidance from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI) and the Division of Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children (DEC/CEC). The standards of these national specialty professional associations have shaped a program that emphasizes teacher development in the areas of assessment, leadership, diversity and reflective best practices.

Contact: Dr. Susan Connelly, program coordinator, at sconnelly@greensboro.edu or 336-272-7102, ext.5414.

Download an application and recommendation form.

 

I have been accepted to the college. What’s next?

  1. Follow these steps.
  2. All new students also must take training on issues with regard to sexual harassment and sexual assault (Title IX training). Here is information on how to take the Title IX training.